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James LINTON

Maître de Conférences - Université de Limoges

Contact : james.linton@unilim.fr

Tél : 05.55.43.55.04


Publications

ACL - Articles dans des revues à comité de lecture

2014
  • Linton Jamie« Modern Water and its Discontents: a history of hydrosocial renewal », WIREs Water, 1 (1), p. 111-120.

  • Linton Jamie« Modern water and its discontents: a history of hydrosocial renewal », Wires Water, 1 (January/February), p. 111-120. https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01135003.
    Résumé : Water planning and management in the 20th century were characterized by a particular way of understanding and relating to water that may be described in terms of 'modern water'. Essentially, modern water is a way of knowing, accounting for, and representing water apart from its social context. Modern water replaced a wealth of different waters whose essence was defined by the social circumstances in which they occurred, rather than by the compound of oxygen and hydrogen to which all waters may be reduced. This paper traces the history of modern water and describes its current retreat in the face of circumstances that call for the resocialization of waters. Several examples of this resocialization are given, including a new way of representing hydrosocial relations known as the 'hydrosocial cycle', the campaign for the human right to water and emerging practices in water engineering and water management.
    Mots-clés : paradigm change, water, water history, Water management.

  • Linton Jamie et Budds Jessica« The hydrosocial cycle: Defining and mobilizing a relational-dialectical approach to water », Geoforum, 57, p. 170-180. https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01134992.
    Résumé : The relationship between water and society has come to the forefront of critical inquiry in recent years, attracting significant scholarly and popular interest. As the state hydraulic paradigm gives way to modes of water governance, there is a need to recognize, reflect and represent water's broader social dimensions. In this article, we advance the concept of the hydrosocial cycle as a means of theorizing and analyzing water-society relations. The hydrosocial cycle is based on the concept of the hydrologic cycle, but modifies it in important ways. While the hydrologic cycle has the effect of separating water from its social context, the hydrosocial cycle deliberately attends to water's social and political nature. We employ a relational-dialectical approach to conceptualize the hydrosocial cycle as a socio-natural process by which water and society make and remake each other over space and time. We argue that unravelling this historical and geographical process of making and remaking offers analytical insights into the social construction and production of water, the ways by which it is made known, and the power relations that are embedded in hydrosocial change. We contend that the hydrosocial cycle comprises a process of co-constitution as well as material circulation. Existing work within the political ecology tradition considers the co-constitution of water and power, particularly in relation to processes of capital accumulation. We propose the hydrosocial cycle as an analytical tool for investigating hydrosocial relations and as a broader framework for undertaking critical political ecologies of water.
    Mots-clés : hydrosocial cycle, political ecology, politics, water.
2013
2012
2011
2010

C-COM - Communications orales dans une conférence nationale ou internationale

2014
2013
2012

OS - Ouvrages scientifiques

2010

CH - Chapitres d'ouvrage

2015
2013
2012
2010